Bible Study


06
Apr 2018
Defying Gravity

I weigh 75 pounds…

On Mars…

Doesn’t that count? Sadly the doctor does not care about my weight on Mars because my force (a.k.a. weight) on Earth is all that matters. Next time you stand on the scale, don’t get mad at it. It’s not the scales fault. You see this thing called gravity intensifies the force upon the surface of the Earth based on your mass. It’s really gravity’s fault!

We live and function under this invisible force called gravity and we really don’t give it much thought. As long as you comply with gravity, life is fairly predictable. Look down from the edge of a cliff and you suddenly recognize the immense power gravity has on your life. If you try to defy gravity, it may not end well.

Job 28 is one of those passages you need to reference often in your Bible because it talks about a different but more powerful and influential force in your life. This force appears in numerous passages throughout Scripture, but in the family of books from Job through Proverbs, this governing law is the crown jewel. Job speaks of man’s resourcefulness as he mines metals from the earth. He descends a shaft into the earth and overturns the “mountains by the roots” (Job 28:9), yet he cannot discover the vault which contains wisdom. Even if you were to interview the deep channels of the ocean, they would admit, “It is not in me” (Job 28:14). With the vantage point of a bird or the prowling of a lion, none can uncover the source of this commodity called wisdom.

Wisdom is this governing law which rules all of God’s creation because God applied divine wisdom when he wove together the components of life together. Man cannot discover the vault nor can he ever esteem wisdom’s value. “The price of wisdom is above rubies” (Job 28:18). It is so elusive even “death and destruction say, ‘We have heard the fame thereof with our ears'” (Job 28:22). How can you ever claim wisdom for yourself? It’s not about where, when, or how much. In order to acquire wisdom, it is about Who. “God understandeth the way thereof, And he knoweth the place thereof” (Job 28:23). When you are in a situation where you lack wisdom, “Ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given” (James 1:5).

It’s interesting after Job speaks poetically about wisdom he talks about weight—the weight of winds and water. When people try to defy gravity it can end badly. Similarly, when people choose to defy wisdom, they too will experience destruction. They may get away with their defiance for a while, but eventually, the bands will snap and their life ends in destruction. You must learn to navigate your life with wisdom.

What is wisdom? I’m glad you asked. Job tells us, “Behold, the fear of the Lord, that is wisdom; And to depart from evil is understanding” (Job 28:28).


05
Apr 2018
Stay Thirsty

God has created our world with a need for water and He has made sure we have an ample supply. Our country not only has water, but we have the means to get it. Some countries are not that fortunate. There are those who live atop a water table and still thirst for the lack of ability to tap into it. All of us have experienced thirst. I remember a song from years ago titled “Cool Water”. Just listening to it made me thirsty. Thirst is designed to cause us to drink to avoid dehydration (another of the God-given intricacies of our bodies). Dehydration at all stages is discomforting.

While reading through Scripture of Jesus’ last hours, we see that He thirsted. None of us have ever suffered as much as Jesus. He endured the torture of the Cross for us. Would I give my life for others? Most likely for family and friends, but surely not for all mankind (Jesus says in Jn.15:13-14, Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends. Ye are my friends, if ye do whatsoever I command you). Not only was Jesus physically thirsty, but spiritually as well. Jesus was on a mission from the Father and He complained about nothing but thirst. His spiritual thirst was to please the Father. At this point, Jesus was severely dehydrated.

When I think of Jesus’ agonizing thirst, I think of Ps.42:1, “As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God.” I envision the many scenes in Africa where all the animals are migrating to a solitary water hole during a drought. During this mass exodus their tongues are hanging out and they are panting due to thirst. Some do not make it, they try but are overcome. It is an example of the spiritual nature of humans. Some make it and some do not; some recognize a need to drink from the Well of living waters; while others, refuse to partake (Jn. 4:14, But whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst; but the water that I shall give him shall be in him a well of water springing up into everlasting life). God invites us all to drink and He has provided a way to tap this Fountain of salvation.

Our lives should be that as the hart (deer). Our souls should be seeking to serve Him that we literally thirst and pant after Him. Our spirits should remain on the verge of dehydration; always needing satisfaction with a drink from God’s Word! “Therefore with joy shall ye draw water out of the wells of salvation” (Is. 12:3). We can stand at the sink all day, but if we do not turn the spigot on we will not receive water. Likewise, we can sit with the Bible; but unless we open it, we will not receive a drink from the Waters of life. Stay thirsty my friends.


04
Apr 2018
Which Way Did He Go?

In 2010, a “highly reliable survey” revealed that men drive an additional 276 miles per year by refusing to ask for directions. The aimless meandering costs him an extra $800! Just think how many purses his wife could purchase if he’d only stop and ask for directions!

Typically, men refrain from asking for directions, but Saul was not wired that way. Saul is often portrayed as a bumbling fool. He is always looking for something, yet, while everyone else intuitively knows where it is, Saul never finds it on his own.

Remember how long he was looking for his father’s donkeys? Then he was looking for the seer, Samuel? A maiden, a young girl, gives Saul directions to Samuel (1 Samuel 9:10-12)! Saul is looking for David to kill him. All three groups of messengers Saul sends find David hiding with Samuel, yet when Saul heads out to find David, what do you find him doing? Asking for directions…again (1 Samuel 12:22)! For the remainder of the book, Saul searches for David. He has spies. He has an army, but he can’t nab that “wascally” David. One such instance, Saul searches for David and has spies skulking about. Jonathan goes to the woods and directly finds David and “strengthens his hand” (1 Samuel 23:15). However, Saul, lost in his spiritual fog, never locates David.

In contrast, David’s navigation system seems fixed on his destination. From the moment God had Samuel anoint David, he finds himself in the king’s house, bearing the king’s armor, fighting the king’s battles, and marrying the king’s daughter. Everything falls into place for David. David sees life clearly. Was Saul “behind the eight ball” and David extremely fortunate?

It comes down to dependence. David does not get it right all the time, but when you see David asking for directions, you usually find him talking to God. Prayer is not a discipline; it is an indication of our dependence. Saul only thinks of seeking God as an afterthought. After searching for the donkeys for three days, it was Saul’s servant who suggested asking the man of God for help. Saul is typically practical. You usually read he is numbering the people or positioning himself strategically by a tree, a wall, or behind other people. Saul’s navigational system was conventional wisdom.

Read the book of Proverbs and James, and you will find divine wisdom is the invisible thread God used to knit the components of life and order in all of creation. Conventional wisdom chooses to see things from ground-level, based on our short-sighted perception. Prayer taps into the wisdom which comes from God “liberally” (James 1:5). If your life is not characterized by prayer, then you may have Saul’s navigational system. Just think of all the wasted years aimlessly wandering. No dollar figure can compensate for such a waste.


03
Apr 2018
Comfort Zone Cover-up
“Who am I to go to Pharaoh?”
Excuse me? Who are you? You were Pharaoh’s daughter’s adopted child. You learned the customs and strategies of the Egyptians. You were taught everything you know from them. There is no question about it, but Moses was qualified. Besides all of that, it didn’t matter who Moses was!
God reminds Moses of something we all need to remember. God says, “Certainly I will be with thee.” God wants Moses to be assured that there is no question. God will be there the whole way. God wants to give Moses a sign, but He knows that Moses is depending on the physical. He gives Moses a promise, just as He did to Abraham—He will worship on this mountain again with the Children of Israel.
When we think of signs we usually think of Gideon and the fleece. We depend on something before we are commissioned. Notice the security of God’s promises. He did not pick that bush as the focus of the promise. He did not pick a rock or a stick, He chose the whole mountain. God’s promise was a sure thing. That mountain isn’t going anywhere. It is something Moses could set his sights on. God gave a definite location. He did not say in the land of Canaan we will meet again see you later. He said Moses, I am with you and I will bring you to this place again.
Moses misses the pass. He does not jump on the wagon with God. He does not capture the burden.
We now see the real force behind all of these questions. Moses is established and he is comfortable. God is putting Moses in a position that he will have to act in faith. He hasn’t really had to act in faith for 40 years. He has just been taking care of sheep. The faith he had to flee Egypt is long passed now. He has lived in this place for 40 years and that is long enough for anyone to be firmly rooted and difficult to uproot. Imagine a tree for 40 years. It is difficult to move that tree. Whenever God’s call comes, we must realize that it will require us moving from our comfort zone. But you see this is helpful. How much was Moses accomplishing for God in Midian? Probably not much and definitely not as much as when he would go to Egypt. Yes, the move would be difficult, but God wanted to put Moses in the best place possible.
This is where Christians fail time and again. They see the plan, they know God is involved, they know something needs to be done, but they let the burden pass on by them. They are content watching their insignificant sheep in the wilderness and are not concerned with the burden of God. Be consumed with the burden of God. Be passionate when He calls you to a task. Let it engulf you with the same passion.
Do you remember where you were spiritually when you felt God’s call in your life? Have you left that place and forgotten about it? Don’t forget about it because God desires you to bring others to that same point and beyond. Don’t squander the divine moments in your life. Don’t miss the pass.

02
Apr 2018
A Healthy Church

As I’m sure some of you might be aware, in addition to a day in which a lot of us have a lot of leftovers filling our refrigerators, tonight happens to feature the college basketball National Championship game between Michigan and Villanova. Our passage this morning has a lot of comparisons between a healthy church and a good basketball team.

In 1 Corinthians 12:4, we are reminded that there are “diversities of gifts”, meaning that there are various spiritual gifts that God gives to individuals. Just as a good basketball team will feature team members with a variety of different skills, so to a healthy church will feature members with various skills and abilities that God has granted to each of us. The next several verses list some of those spiritual gifts, which we will not cover, but suffice it to say that it is generally accepted that God has granted each believer with at least one individual spiritual gift that He desires we use in and through a local church.

Verse fourteen reminds us that “the body is not one member, but many.” Just as a championship basketball is not just made up of one star player and a bunch of “nobodies” off the street, so to a healthy church will not be made up of a godly pastor and a bunch of “pew-warmers.” God desires for each of us to know what gifts and abilities He has gifted us with and actively look for opportunities to use them in the local body of Christ. Verse eighteen reminds us that He has “set” the members in the body as He has desired for a specific purpose.

Just as a winning basketball team needs to work together as a unit, with each team member contributing based on their individual skill and ability, so to a healthy New Testament church must function in a similar way. It is not just the pastor’s job to carry the responsibilities of the church while the rest of us offer the occasional helping hand, but instead God desires to use Anthony Baptist as each of us fills a necessary role in the advancement of the church, the Gospel and the overall work of God in this community. We need to avoid the temptation to just sit back and “enjoy” church but instead actively do our part so that Anthony Baptist functions to its optimal potential as God intended.


Page 3 of 4712345...102030...Last »