The Art of Self-Deception

The Art of Self-Deception

There are many studies to which an individual may devote themselves in life. Some are admirable and virtuous in there undertaking, others, not so much. One of these comes quite naturally to all of us. I like to call it; the art of self-deception. It is neither admirable, nor virtuous; yet we seem to engage in it without hesitation. It’s something we so often accuse the world of doing, as believers. We sit back, thumb our nose at the vilest of sinners, and say something like, “That man is fooling himself if he thinks he’s gonna get away with that!” The truth in our sentiment doesn’t change the reality of the situation: we engage in the same trade almost as frequently, and sometimes, with a greater degree of intensity.

The passage before us examines this trade with incomparable sharpness. It discusses it’s origins, and provides a remedy that can’t be found anywhere else. The art of self-deception is something that comes natural to all of us. The classroom of life furthers our experience and study in this matter. Christians are called to be, “doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves.” Self-deception is something that quickly originates within the human heart, and expands within the mind of an individual who forsakes the counsel of God’s Word. Merely hearing, and not doing, epitomizes self-deception better than anything else. We “hear,” when we sit under the preaching of God’s Word, and when we are exposed to that truth through private and personal meditation/devotion.

We lie to ourselves when we believe that a life lived apart from God and His Word is, “okay.” We lie to ourselves when we believe that, “I’m not as bad as my neighbor.” We are self deceived when we are confronted with our sin, and choose to ignore our need for repentance. In such cases, we embody what it means to be, “living a lie.” It’s a detestable situation, and one in which no Christian should find themselves. Yet, too often, we do. The remedy to this ongoing struggle is to treat God’s Word as our daily mirror. I seriously doubt that most people reading this haven’t used a household mirror at least once already today! Likely it’s part of your morning routine to some degree. That’s because you don’t want to go about life, self deceived, thinking you look better than you do. You’d rather not have your neighbor remind you that your hair’s a mess. Treat God’s Word in the same manner, spiritually. Fix what is broken, and make what is already good better. By doing this daily, you can avoid the all too present art of self-deception.

    %d bloggers like this: