The Eyes of the Lord

The Eyes of the Lord

Little kids are funny. It doesn’t take long at all before they’re as clever as our first parents were in the garden. Clever only in the human sense, for God’s wisdom exceeds our cunning and capability. But they quickly catch on to the parental expectations that we have for them, the “do’s and dont’s.” It doesn’t take long for them to figure out what’s right and wrong, and to issue a challenge to it. Our youngest (2) has a certain proclivity for hiding to accomplish some undesirable task. Usually this involves taking something that he has been instructed not to have in his possession. Something that will create, what I like to call, chaos. When I’m watching and aware of his antics, he’s brilliantly cute and obedient. Before my face he’s the sweet, innocent puppy. But oftentimes he hides, he’s sneaky, and he does things he should not.

The Bible beautifully connects blessing with obedience. This was different for Israel than it is for the church age believer, but it exists nonetheless. God still has His judgments, commandments, precepts, and laws; all of which we have an obligation to obey. But so often we are “good” and “obedient” when it is expedient for us, or when someone else is watching. It’s easy to project a certain standard of living (which may or may not be true) before our fellow brothers and sisters in Christ. It seems somewhat important we maintain that, especially considering that a large amount of Christian fellowship and “fun” is inherently connected to it. But the Bible very clearly states: “Blessed are they that keep judgment, and he that doeth righteousness at all times.” I find the last 3 words of that verse to be especially meaningful and worth deep consideration. Especially in light of other Scripture.

Proverbs 15:3 reminds us that the eyes of the Lord are in every place. He sees both the good, and the evil. James 4:17 reminds us that it is wrong to avoid doing good when we know to we ought to do it. So we can summarize Psalm 106:3 in the following manner: living righteously at all times involves, not merely an abstinence from that which is evil, but an obligation toward that which is good. The Christian is created in Christ Jesus “unto good works.” Yet so often we find ourselves seemingly clawing out of the pit of despair and sin. Why? Christ came that He might destroy the works of the devil and render them dead. Let us then walk, at all times, in the living righteousness that we now have in and through Him.

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