Showroom Living

Showroom Living

On our way to New York City for our trip to Bolivia, the guys happened to be talking cars and trucks. Surprised, right? Well, not just any ordinary car or truck. We were talking about the ones guys buy from showroom floors. How about a truck with a price tag over $110,000 with a carpeted bed? As one of the guys said, “What are you supposed to do with that?”
Great question! With the exquisite artistry invested into the Tabernacle, Bezaleel and Aholiab, left an indelible mark of what God can do through people who are ready to serve. By yielding their talents, God was able to use them, and their craftsmanship would point generations of Israelites to God. By choosing to glorify God, they were useful. 
Jesus reveals his motivation for ministry in the prayer for his disciples in John 17. Leading to his crucifixion, he could have stopped short of completing the mission. Hadn’t he done enough on earth? He had made the blind to see, the lame to walk, the lungs of the dead breathe life again. However, to truly glorify the Father required a reckless abandonment of self. As one song describes it, Christ was broken, spilled out, and used up. 
Paul craved the good thing the Lord would accomplish in him. His confidence was based in the faithfulness of God. Whether it was to preach the gospel in or out of bonds, Paul was willing to be used. Whether others preached Christ in support of Paul or to spite him, Paul was willing to be a sacrifice offered for the glory of God. “Whether it be by life, or by death…so now also Christ shall be magnified in my body” (Philippians 1:20).
These three examples are only a sample of the lives throughout history who have refused showroom living. C. T. Studd described this way of life in his booklet entitled The Chocolate Soldier: “They dissolve in water and melt at the smell of fire. ‘Sweeties’ they are! Bonbons, lollipops! Living their lives on a glass dish or in a cardboard box, each clad in his soft clothing, a little frilled white paper to preserve his dear little delicate constitution.”
Ouch! What we need to decide is whether we will live a life with the illusion of usefulness or not. The illusion of usefulness is the body of a truck, but with carpet in the bed. You are not interested in using such a vehicle for labor. “In all labour there is profit” but simply talking about it doesn’t add up to much. Truly showroom living is “the folly of fools” which is an illusion. The wise understands his way. 
What sort of life are you living? Are you living the illusion of usefulness, or are you engaged in a daily labor to point others to God. 
“That they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven” (Matthew 5:16).

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